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Southeast Asia

Using An Integrated Environmental-Economic Accounting Framework For Sustainable Management Of A World Heritage Area

A conceptual framework based on accounting principles of stocks, flows, and investment can be applied to natural capital, social and cultural capital, human capital and financial and physical capitals. Development and application of this framework can help to reveal the environmental, social and economic impacts and interactions of prevailing land use (or other management) practices, and provide a way of assessing the effectiveness of different programmes for achieving desired management objectives.

Ibis Rice: Conserving Critically Endangered Birds And Supporting Local Livelihoods In Protected Areas Through A Certified Sustainable Agriculture PES Scheme In Northern Cambodia

Ibis Rice is a scheme, active since 2007 in three Protected Areas in Northern Cambodia, whereby communities are incentivized to protect critical habitat through sales of a high-quality agricultural product. Under the scheme, farmers that abide by the rules, including agreed land-use plans and no-hunting laws, are able to sell their rice through the village committee, which is legally mandated to administer the land-use plan.

Lessons From The Implementation Of The Wealth Accounting And Valuation Of Ecosystem Services (Waves) Project : The Case Of The Southern Palawan, Philippines

The systematic accounting of a country’s natural wealth and the goods and services the ecosystem offer, provides opportunities to generate information and better understand the natural environment’s contribution to the economy. This on the other hand offer support policies and decision in the pursuit of sustainable development taking into account environmental economic and socio-political dimensions.

Wildlife-Friendly Ibis RiceTM Of Cambodia’s Northern Plains

‘Wildlife-Friendly Ibis RiceTM’ is grown in the paddy fields of Preah Vihear province, on Cambodia’s Northern Plains. The Ibis RiceTM project aims to protect critically endangered birds and mammals, and prevent further loss of their habitat, which is being replaced by large and small-scale agriculture. Small-scale farmers from fifteen villages receive a price premium on their rice, in exchange for implementing conservation agreements. These limit the conversion of wetland areas to rice fields, and ban hunting of rare water birds.

Integrating Low Technologies With New Ones In Protected Area Management

It is a well-known fact that indigenous peoples and/or local communities living in and around natural areas are custodians of traditional and working knowledge of the geography and forests where they live. In Sarawak, Malaysia (northwestern Borneo), engaging indigenous communities is an integral part of management and conservation of forests, including in and around protected areas. At least one non-governmental organisation (NGO) in Sarawak is working with these communities to obtain baseline data for management purposes.

The Role Of Women In Early REDD+ Implementation: Lessons For Future Generations

Researchers and practitioners have extensively discussed the potential of Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD+) strategies to help or harm forest-based communities, but less attention has been paid to the gender dimensions of this conservation intervention. Safeguard policies aim to ensure that REDD+ does not harm women, but interventions that do not seek to address gender imbalances at the outset could end up perpetuating them.

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