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The NBSAP Forum contains an extensive library of best practices related to developing and implementing NBSAPs. Our purpose is to enable countries to share and learn about effective, field-tested techniques and solutions. We work closely with our members to document the problem addressed, for whom, the primary actions, how they achieved results, and the solution they achieved. Search for or submit your best pratice here.

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    Designing The Regional Conservation System For The Cusco Region, Peru

    In Cusco, Peru, although there have been initiatives in establishing protected areas (currently 11% of the territory is protected), many fragile ecosystems are yet to be protected. However, many conservation initiatives have been undertaken by players that are not aware of the efforts by other players in many cases undermining the whole cause of nature conservation by creating conflicts.

    Empowering Communities. The Only Way To Ensure The Conservation Of Nature And Communities Welfare

    This best practice story is intended to show how, through Empowering 18 communities, the good governance became a reality. El Núcleo Endógeno de Desarrollo Socialista de Suruguapo (NUDESUR) is located in Portuguesa state, Venezuela. NUDESUR was created in 2006, by 34 joined villages, 18 from the foot hills and 16 from the mountains, with the favor of the Energy and Oil Ministry (MPPEP – Barinas), the financial support of the national oil company (PDVSA-División Boyacá Barinas), and connecting with 22 other Regional and National organizations.

    How To Get The Youth Involved: The Story Of Let's Get Wild

    The „Let’s get wild“ project is about wilderness project weeks in Austria´s secondary high schools. This wilderness school project will support the Austrian regional development plan by promoting the acceptance of national parks within the younger population. Through multimedia and interdisciplinary environmental education, the role of the Austrian National Parks in the protection and preservation of the natural, recreational value, biodiversity and climate protection is emphasized.

    Gestion Du Parc National La Visite

    La République d’Haïti se trouve dans l’hémisphère nord, spécifiquement dans le bassin de la Caraïbe, entre la mer des caraïbes et l’Océan Atlantique. Elle se situe entre 18°0’ et 20°6’ de latitude Nord et 71°20’ et 74°30’ de longitude Ouest (PNUE/MDE, 2010). Elle est également connue sous les appellations Quisqueya ou «Bohio». Avec une superficie de 27.750 km2elle partage avec la République Dominicaine l’ile d’Hispaniola qui est la deuxième plus grande en superficie dans la Caraïbe.

    Mainstreaming Biodiversity And Wetland Rehabilitation Into The South African Wine Industry

    South Africa’s Cape Floral Region (CFR) is one of the world’s great centres of terrestrial biodiversity. It is home to nearly 20% of Africa’s flora, while covering less than 0.5% of the continent’s area. The wetlands in this sensitive area face particular threats, including from development and agriculture, as the region is also home to farms growing around 95% of South Africa’s wine. On-farm conservation measures are therefore vital to protect the outstanding diversity, density and endemism of the biodiversity of the CFR.

    Conservation On The High Seas: Mainstreaming Biodiv. Into Intern. Policies And Fishing Practices

    Accidental capture (“bycatch”) of a wide range of non-target species is a significant issue for the fishing industry, and for marine biodiversity. Bycatch has a severe impact on many charismatic marine species such as albatrosses, cetaceans, sharks and sea turtles, which often cross vast distances and can be highly vulnerable to bycatch. Every year longline and trawl fishing fleets kill an estimated 300,000 seabirds, driving some albatross species towards extinction.

    Intern. Investment In Renewable Energy: Safeguarding Migrating Birds In Red Sea/Rift Valley Flyway

    At the end of the European summer, two million soaring birds head south towards Africa. Their route, along the Red Sea/Rift Valley flyway, is the second most important flyway for soaring birds in the world. However, just as these areas are essential to the birds’ survival, so too are they vital for human populations, and host a growing concentration of development and energy infrastructure. If power lines and wind turbines are poorly sited along the flyway, the cumulative impacts can add up to threaten entire bird populations.

    Wildlife-Friendly Ibis RiceTM Of Cambodia’s Northern Plains

    ‘Wildlife-Friendly Ibis RiceTM’ is grown in the paddy fields of Preah Vihear province, on Cambodia’s Northern Plains. The Ibis RiceTM project aims to protect critically endangered birds and mammals, and prevent further loss of their habitat, which is being replaced by large and small-scale agriculture. Small-scale farmers from fifteen villages receive a price premium on their rice, in exchange for implementing conservation agreements. These limit the conversion of wetland areas to rice fields, and ban hunting of rare water birds.

    Integrating Conservation Objectives Into Hunting Regulations In Syria And Lebanon

    Many migratory soaring birds journey between Europe, Western and Central Asia and Africa. They face unsustainable levels of hunting in many countries along their route, including Syria and Lebanon. Tackling hunting is one element of the Migratory Soaring Birds (MSB) Project, which addresses a range of threats to these birds from economic sectors along the Red Sea/Rift Valley Flyway. The aim is to promote the principles of responsible hunting, including within legislation, in order to minimize impacts on populations of migratory soaring birds.

    Integrating Protection Of Migratory Soaring Birds Into Egypt’s Renewable Energy Sector

    Growing energy demands, together with the urgent need to transition to renewable energy, have led to plans to put up more than five million kilometres of new power lines across Africa over the next five years. Egypt plans to generate 20% of its energy from renewable sources by 2020. Although well-intentioned, these plans need to be implemented in ways that mitigate risks to migratory soaring birds, which are threatened by collisions with wind turbines and electrocution on power lines.